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Mountains of England & Wales - Summits 1-50

Summits 1-50  Summits 51-100  Summits 101-150  Summits 151-200  Summits 201-258

The "Top Fifty" mountains in England & Wales includes the highest peak in Wales - Snowdon - and the highest peak in England - Scafell Pike. The list also includes Cadair Idris, Helvellyn and Moel Siabod in Snowdonia, the highest summit in the Brecon Beacons and a number of Lake District fells including Helvellyn, Skiddaw, and Great Gable. Also featured is the highest mountain outside of the National Parks - Cross Fell in the North Pennines.

MountainGroup
1 - Snowdon
(1085 m - 3560 ft)
SnowdonWalks
2 - Garnedd Ugain
(1065 m - 3494 ft)
SnowdonWalks
3 - Carnedd Llywelyn
(1064 m - 3491 ft)
CarneddauWalks
4 - Carnedd Dafydd
(1044 m - 3425 ft)
CarneddauWalks
5 - Glyder Fawr
(1001 m - 3284 ft)
GlydersWalks
6 - Glyder Fach
(994 m - 3261 ft)
GlydersWalks
7 - Pen yr Ole Wen
(978 m - 3209 ft)
CarneddauWalks
8 - Scafell Pike
(978 m - 3209 ft)
ScafellWalks
9 - Foel-grach
(976 m - 3202 ft)
CarneddauWalks
10 - Sca Fell
(964 m - 3163 ft)
ScafellWalks
11 - Yr Elen
(962 m - 3156 ft)
CarneddauWalks
12 - Helvellyn
(950 m - 3117 ft)
HelvellynWalks
13 - Y Garn
(947 m - 3107 ft)
GlydersWalks
14 - Foel-fras
(942 m - 3091 ft)
CarneddauWalks
15 - Skiddaw
(931 m - 3054 ft)
SkiddawWalks
16 - Elidir Fawr
(924 m - 3031 ft)
GlydersWalks
17 - Crib Goch
(923 m - 3028 ft)
SnowdonWalks
18 - Tryfan
(915 m - 3002 ft)
GlydersWalks
19 - Great End
(910 m - 2986 ft)
ScafellWalks
20 - Aran Fawddwy
(905 m - 2969 ft)
AransWalks
21 - Bowfell
(902 m - 2959 ft)
BowfellWalks
22 - Great Gable
(899 m - 2949 ft)
Great GableWalks
23 - Y Lliwedd
(898 m - 2946 ft)
SnowdonWalks
24 - Cross Fell
(893 m - 2930 ft)
Cross FellWalks
25 - Cadair Idris
(893 m - 2930 ft)
Cadair IdrisWalks
26 - Pillar
(892 m - 2927 ft)
Great GableWalks
27 - Catstye Cam
(890 m - 2920 ft)
HelvellynWalks
28 - Pen y Fan
(886 m - 2907 ft)
Brecon Beacons 
29 - Aran Benllyn
(885 m - 2904 ft)
AransWalks
30 - Esk Pike
(885 m - 2904 ft)
ScafellWalks
31 - Raise
(883 m - 2897 ft)
Raise 
32 - Fairfield
(873 m - 2864 ft)
FairfieldWalks
33 - Moel Siabod
(872 m - 2861 ft)
Moelwyns 
34 - Blencathra
(868 m - 2848 ft)
Blencathra 
35 - Little Man
(865 m - 2838 ft)
SkiddawWalks
36 - Mynydd Moel
(863 m - 2831 ft)
Cadair IdrisWalks
37 - Crinkle Crags
(859 m - 2818 ft)
BowfellWalks
38 - Dollywaggon Pike
(858 m - 2815 ft)
HelvellynWalks
39 - Great Dodd
(857 m - 2812 ft)
Raise 
40 - Arenig Fawr
(854 m - 2802 ft)
Arenigs 
41 - Grasmoor
(852 m - 2795 ft)
Buttermere 
42 - Great Dun Fell
(848 m - 2782 ft)
Cross FellWalks
43 - Stybarrow Dodd
(843 m - 2766 ft)
Raise 
44 - Little Dun Fell
(842 m - 2762 ft)
Cross FellWalks
45 - Little Scoat Fell
(841 m - 2759 ft)
Great GableWalks
46 - St Sunday Crag
(841 m - 2759 ft)
FairfieldWalks
47 - Crag Hill
(839 m - 2753 ft)
Buttermere 
48 - Pen yr Helgi-du
(833 m - 2733 ft)
CarneddauWalks
49 - Foel-goch
(831 m - 2726 ft)
GlydersWalks
50 - Cadair Berwyn - South Top
(830 m - 2723 ft)
Berwyns 

Summits 1-50  Summits 51-100  Summits 101-150  Summits 151-200  Summits 201-258

What is a mountain?

The accepted standard for a mountain in England & Wales is that its summit is 610 metres (2000 feet) or more above sea level. In addition, rules are in place on the height difference above intervening cols with adjacent summits to determine whether a summit is a separate mountain or a subsidiary 'top'. This is not the place to discuss the technicalities of this issue but the list has been checked against reliable tables. With simplicity in mind separate tops have been excluded from the list as these would normally be discussed in relation to their main summits. The list includes 258 summits and these will all be added in due course starting from the highest and working down.

Stay Safe

Do enjoy yourself when out walking and choose a route that is within your capabilities especially with regard to navigation.

Do turn back if the weather deteriorates especially in winter or when visibility is poor.

Do wear the right clothing for the anticipated weather conditions. If the weather is likely to change for the worse make sure you have enough extra clothing in your pack.

Do tell someone where you are planning to walk especially in areas that see few other walkers.

Do take maps and other navigational aids. Do not rely on mobile devices in areas where reception is poor. Take spare batteries especially in cold weather.

Do check the weather forecast before leaving. The Met Office has a number of forecasts for walkers that identify specific weather risks.

Please Note - These walks have been published for use by site visitors on the understanding that Walking Britain is not held responsible for the safety or well being of those following the routes as described. It is worth reiterating the point that you should embark on a walk with the correct maps preferably at 1:25000 scale. This will enable any difficulties with route finding to be assessed and corrective action taken if necessary.

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